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2016 – Details of the 1st Debate

Body language, vocal tones, viewing angles, and more are described while observing the 2016 First Presidential Debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. This is a detailed look at the non-verbal cues and other staging issues that took place while the candidates exchanged barbs.2016-first-debate

The clips are taken from the online webcasts posted by the New York Times and CBS News. The 8-minute “condensed” video focuses on comparisons between the candidates, taken at various times during the debate.

Click on the image to navigate to the visual analysis.

Discussion-Style Debate

In the third and final Presidential debate of 2012, the candidates were seated in a “discussion” style format. The non-verbal actions of the upper body are visible, especially with respect to the various camera angles and closeups.

This analysis focuses on upper body actions, including visibility of gestures, eye contact, hand positons, confrontation, and speaking style.

Click on the image to navigate to the visual analysis.
2012 Third Presidential Debate

Town Hall Debate

In the second of three Presidential Debates, the Town Hall setting offered the candidates the chance to move freely in an open area. This allowed for an in-depth review of of performance issues, including body language, eye contact, hand gestures, proximity, navigation, confrontation and speaking style.

Non-verbal cues dominate during planned or prepared speaking venues and both candidates were prepared not only to discuss the issues, but to directly confront one another in the process.

In this debate, Barack Obama redeemed himself from his previous lackluster performance by adding action, energy and a sense of leadership, while Mitt Romney remained steady, similar to the way he appeared in the first debate.

Click on the image to navigate to the visual analysis. 2012 Second Presidential Debate

When Candidates Debate

Body language is clearly a function of energy and action. The non-verbal cues dominate during planned or prepared speaking venues and the first Presidential debate was no exception.

Using a series of captured images from the debate of October 3, 2012, an analysis of the differences between the candidates offers a glimpse into what turned out to be two quite unexpected performances.

Click on the image to navigate to the visual analysis. 2012 First Debate

When a TV Ad Goes Wrong

National Car Rental Commercial "Robin the Presenter"A television commercial touting the business skills of a rising young executive only serves to make her look less than professional.

First aired during the 2010 Super Bowl, National Car Rental sends the wrong corporate message to would-be presenters in a corporate world. Read more… →

Observing Body Language

The actions of the body can add or detract from the speaker’s words, depending on the level of consistency in the movements. A recent Charlie Rose interview of Bill Gates offers an opportunity to see how the hands are used to emphasize key points, and where the challenges exist when the actions are inconsistent.

Click on the image to navigate to the video clip.Bill Gates - Charlie Rose - Interview

Multimedia or Multi-MANIA?

There is a fine line between the use and the abuse of technology elements. In a featured article published in the PresentationXpert newsletter, Tom Mucciolo shares some techniques for incorporating animation, video, sound, and slide transitions into presentations.

Read the whole story: Keep multimedia from morphing into multi-mania

Looking your best on camera

Tom Mucciolo is interviewed by Mark Ragan, CEO of Ragan Communications on Ragan TV. This is part of a series (see the “Interviews” category). This clip features a discussion of how to be more effective on camera. Read more… →

Give ’em a Hand on Broadway

You can learn a lot about the power of hand gestures by watching Ben Vereen and the entire cast from the Broadway musical PIPPIN. Read more… →

Coldplay Reaches Out

The Coldplay hit Viva la Vida is loosely translated as “Long Live Life” but lead-singer Chris Martin creates a unique connection to his audience with a series of rhythmic “reaching out” gestures. Read more… →

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