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Video Clips

Skill Development

These videos are hosted on Tom Mucciolo’s YouTube Channel.

Scroll down to see the videos, or choose a video clip from this list:

Predictability in Communication
Anchoring to One Side
The Presenter’s Triangle™
Three Positions of the Triangle
Rest and Power Positions
Interaction – Making an Offer
Shifting Weight
Gesturing for Help
Avoiding Fillers

Predictability in Communication

In conversation, the verbal and nonverbal components of delivery are relatively equal. But with prepared content the nonverbal cues dominate. When audiences are able to reliably “predict” actions and vocal inflections, noticing little or no distractions, the intended message gains clarity.

 


Anchoring to One Side

When using visual support, present from the reading-anchor side of the room. For example, if the content is in English, present from the audience left-side since the reading pattern is left-to-right.

 


The Presenter’s Triangle™

Body language is based on proximity — how close or how far you are from people. The Presenter’s Triangle™ is an imaginary space in which to move while speaking.

 


Three Positions of the Triangle

The Presenter’s Triangle™ only uses three positions, or places, for movement within the defined space. This allows for consistency in delivery.

 


Rest and Power Positions

There are only two body positions: REST and POWER. Your shoulders are used to create these positions.

The REST position (45-degree angle to room) is used most often. The POWER position (squared-off to back of room) is used to create greater impact.

 


Interaction – Making an Offer

Interaction is effectively achieved through an “offer” where the audience knows who is invited to participate and who is selected. Scoping and Targeting gestures are used for this purpose.

“Scoping” defines those included in the offer (as in a question, for example). “Targeting” denotes a choice among those who accept the offer (such as those who raise a hand to participate).

 


Shifting Weight

To make gestures appear “natural” your weight should be shifted to one foot or the other. This off-balance stance will allow your body to look relaxed and you will appear in command of the material.

 


Gesturing for Help

Once the hands are established as communication tools, you can use gestures to reference content without appearing as if you are reading information or getting help on the topic from the visual.

 


Avoiding Fillers

“Fillers” are the sounds we make in-between the words we say, such as: um, er, okay, right, etc. This is just the mind “thinking out loud”; but, the audience should not be hearing anything except silence (no sound) while you are thinking.